Conference announcements

Call for Workshop Papers -
ACM Conference on Systems, Programming, Languages, and Applications: Software for Humanity (SPLASH'2012)


From: Ulrik Pagh Schultz <ups@mmmi.sdu.dk>
To: "seworld@sigsoft.org" <seworld@sigsoft.org>
Date: Thu, 7 Jun 2012 16:33:39 +0200
Subject: [SEWORLD] SPLASH'12 Workshops: Call for Papers and Participation

**************************************************************
CALL FOR WORKSHOPS PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION
(deadlines throughout August, see individual calls)

SPLASH'12 WORKSHOPS are part of

ACM Conference on Systems, Programming, Languages, and Applications:
Software for Humanity (SPLASH'12)
Tucson, Arizona
October 19-26, 2012
http://www.splashcon.org
http://twitter.com/splashcon
http://www.facebook.com/SPLASHCon
Sponsored by ACM SIGPLAN
**************************************************************

SPLASH'12 Workshops will address a rich variety of well-known and
new emerging research areas, and will provide you a creative and
collaborative environment, to discuss and solve challenging problems,
with attendees from industry and research organizations around the
world.

To take advantage of this opportunity please consider to contribute to
the workshops that best fit your interests by submitting your research
work, experiences, or position papers.

In addition to the regular workshops, this year we are running a
number of "Wavefront workshops" designed to bring together researchers
and practitioners for hands-on workshops relevant to industrial
practitioners and academics interested in learning new and interesting
yet well-proven techniques.

All deadlines are in August, but vary from workshop to workshop, as
can be seen below.  Many workshops will have their proceedings
published in ACM Digital Library.  In general, please visit the
splashcon.org website and each workshop's website to find up-to-date
information.

**************************************************************

WORKSHOP PROGRAM - REGULAR

The SPLASH'12 workshops program is listed below and the abstracts at
the end, however, the full program and additional information will
evolve and will be posted online at SPLASH'12 website.
http://splashcon.org

AGERE! - 2nd Int. Workshop on Programming based on Actors, Agents, and
Decentralized Control
organized by Gul Agha, Rafael Bordini, Assaf Marron and Alessandro Ricci
Submissions deadline: August 5 (abstract), August 12 (paper), 2012
http://agere2012.apice.unibo.it

DCP - Developing Competency in Parallelism: Techniques for Education
and Training
organized by Richard A. Brown and Edward F. Gehringer
Submissions deadline: August 24, 2012
http://tinyurl.com/SPLASH-2012-DCP

DSM - 12th Domain-Specific Modeling Workshop
organized by Juha-Pekka Tolvanen, Jonathan Sprinkle, Matti Rossi and
Jeff Gray
Submissions deadline: August 10, 2012
URL: http://www.dsmforum.org/events/DSM12/

FOOL - 19th International Workshop on Foundations of
Object-Oriented Languages
organized by John Boyland, Jeremy Siek, and Jonathan Aldrich
Submissions deadline: August 5 (abstract), August 12 (paper), 2012
http://www.cs.uwm.edu/~boyland/fool2012

FREECO - 3rd Workshop on Free Composition
organized by Christoph Bockisch, Lodewijk Bergmans, Ian Piumarta, and
Steven te Brinke
Submissions deadline: August 17, 2012
URL: http://trese.ewi.utwente.nl/workshops/FREECO/FREECO-SPLASH2012/

PLATEAU - Workshop on Evaluation and Usability of Programming
Languages and Tools
organized by Shane Markstrum, Emerson Murphy-Hill, and Caitlin
Sadowski
Submissions deadline: August 10, 2012
https://sites.google.com/site/workshopplateau/

RACES - SPLASH 2012 Workshop on Relaxing Synchronization for Multicore
and Manycore Scalability
organized by Andrew P. Black, Theo D'Hondt, Doug Kimelman, Martin
Rinard and David Ungar
Submissions deadline: August 6, 2012
http://soft.vub.ac.be/races/

VMIL'12 - 6th Workshop on Virtual Machines and Intermediate Languages
organized by Hridesh Rajan, Christoph Bockisch, Michael Haupt, and
Steve Blackburn
Submissions deadline: August 17, 2012
http://design.cs.iastate.edu/vmil/

xDD - What Drives Design?
organized by Dennis Mancl, Steven D. Fraser, Gail E. Harris, and Bill
Opdyke
Submissions deadline: August 27, 2012
http://mysite.verizon.net/dennis.mancl/splash12

WORKSHOP PROGRAM - WAVEFRONT

DCI - Data-Context-Interaction Paradigm Workshop
organized by James O. Coplien
http://splash.cleanarchitecture.com

Neo4j: A Programmatic Introduction to Neo4j
organized by James Webber
http://jimwebber.org/

FOR MORE INFORMATION

For additional information, clarification, early feedback, or answers
to questions, please contact the Workshop Organizers of your favorite
workshops, or the Workshops Chairs, Ademar Aguiar and Ulrik Pagh
Schultz, at workshops@splashcon.org


**************************************************************

ANNEX: WORKSHOP ABSTRACTS AND DATES

**************************************************************

AGERE! - 2nd Int. Workshop on Programming based on Actors, Agents, and
Decentralized Control
organized by Gul Agha, Rafael Bordini, Assaf Marron and Alessandro Ricci
(Sunday 21st and Monday 22nd of October)

The fundamental turn of software into concurrency and distribution is
not only a matter of performance, but also of design and
abstraction. It calls for programming paradigms that, compared to
current mainstream paradigms, would allow us to more naturally think
about, design, develop, execute, debug, and profile systems exhibiting
different degrees of concurrency, autonomy, decentralization of
control, and physical distribution.

The AGERE! workshop is dedicated on programming systems, languages and
applications based on actors, agents and any related programming
paradigm promoting a decentralized-control mindset in solving problems
and in developing systems to implement such solutions.

The workshop is designed to cover both the theory and the practice of
design and programming, bringing together researchers and
practitioners working on programming models, languages, technologies,
as well as real-world systems and applications.

Submissions deadline: August 5 (abstract), August 12 (paper), 2012

URL: http://agere2012.apice.unibo.it

**************************************************************

DCI - Data-Context-Interaction Paradigm Workshop
organized by James O. Coplien (Monday, 22nd October)

This is a Wavefront workshop that provides a foundation for exploring
and applying the DCI (Data, Context and Interaction) paradigm. DCI is
a means to supporting full object orientation that restores much of
the original object vision that has been lost as the industry has
adopted classes rather than objects as its primary design and
programming artefacts, and extends the original vision from a more
data-centric structure to focus more on the business value of
system-level operations. The tutorial will teach roles and contexts as
fundamental new building blocks of object-oriented programs. DCI is a
paradigm that more faithfully lives up to the original goals of the
object paradigm in its basis in stakeholder mental models, its
proximity to end user concerns, and its dynamic computational model,
than one finds in class-oriented programming.

URL: http://splash.cleanarchitecture.com

**************************************************************

DCP - Developing Competency in Parallelism: Techniques for Education
and Training
organized by Richard A. Brown and Edward F. Gehringer (Monday, 22nd of
October)

With the increasing penetration of parallelism into computing,
programmers of all stripes need to acquire competencies in parallel
programming. This workshop will concentrate on discussing and
disseminating resources for gently introducing parallelism into
programmers' skill sets.  The expected audience is academic faculty
and industrial trainers.

The program will include multiple refereed paper sessions, as well as
a separate hands-on session (contributed by organizers) presenting an
example body of materials for teaching and training in parallel
programming, and an "unconference" session, for which you may submit
topics for discussion by filling out a form (for details, see the
workshop web page).

We are seeking paper submissions along the following lines:
- Training materials from developers and vendors of programming
  languages.
- Short "killer" parallel application examples that can be used in
  academic or training environments.
- Short modules that can be used in short courses for practicing
  programmers, or dropped into academic courses dealing with some
  aspect of programming.
- Tools for visualizing or teaching parallelism in programming. (A
  tools submission should include expository illustrations,
  screenshots, and/or accompanying video(s) that portray the
  functionality and value of that tool for pedagogy and training; test
  access to a tool is optional.)
We especially seek papers related to
- GPU, or hybrid (GPU+CPU) programming, or
- productive parallel-programming frameworks scuh as Hadoop/MapReduce.

Submissions deadline: August 24, 2012

URL: http://tinyurl.com/SPLASH-2012-DCP

**************************************************************

DSM - 12th Domain-Specific Modeling Workshop
organized by Juha-Pekka Tolvanen, Jonathan Sprinkle, Matti Rossi and
Jeff Gray (Monday, 22nd October)

Domain-specific modeling (DSM) provides a modern solution to demands
for higher productivity by constricting the gap between problem and
solution modeling. In the past, productivity gains have been sought
through new programming languages. Today, domain-specific modeling
languages provide a viable solution for continuing to raise the level
of abstraction beyond coding, making development faster and easier.

In DSM, the models are constructed using concepts that represent
things in the application domain, not concepts of a given programming
language. The modeling language follows the domain abstractions and
semantics, allowing developers to perceive themselves as working
directly with domain concepts. Together with frameworks and platforms,
DSM can automate a large portion of software production.

Some possible topics for submission to the workshop include:
* Industry/academic experience reports
* Creation of metamodel-based languages
* Empirical studies or assessments that suggest best practices for
  language design
* Novel approaches for code generation from domain-specific models
* Evolution of languages
* Metamodeling frameworks and languages
* Tools for supporting DSMs

Submissions deadline: August 10, 2012

URL: http://www.dsmforum.org/events/DSM12/

**************************************************************

FOOL - 19th International Workshop on Foundations of Object-Oriented
Languages
organized by John Boyland, Jeremy Siek, and Jonathan Aldrich (Monday
October 22nd, 2012)

The search for sound principles for object-oriented languages has given
rise to much work during the past two decades, leading to a better
understanding of the key concepts of object-oriented languages and to
important developments in type theory, semantics, program verification,
and program development.

Submissions for this event are invited in the general area of
foundations of object-oriented languages. Topics of interest include
language semantics, type systems, memory models, program verification,
formal calculi, concurrent and distributed languages, database
languages, and language-based security issues.

Submissions deadline: August 5 (abstract), August 12 (paper), 2012

URL: http://www.cs.uwm.edu/~boyland/fool2012

**************************************************************

FREECO - 3rd Workshop on Free Composition
organized by Christoph Bockisch, Lodewijk Bergmans, Ian Piumarta, and
Steven te Brinke (Monday, 22nd October)

The history of programming languages shows a continuous search for new
composition mechanisms, which are better suited for structuring
increasingly complex software systems into modules that can be
developed and reused independently. Well-known examples are procedure
calls, object aggregation, function composition, inheritance,
delegation, mix-ins, aspects, and so forth. Composition mechanisms can
address various forms of composition of objects or components at the
level of their behavior or interactions, e.g., by design patterns,
contracts or explicit protocols. They can be general-purpose, but
there is also a wide variety of domain-specific compositions, which
are applicable for certain categories of applications.

However, most languages adopt a very small and fixed set of
composition mechanisms, usually with explicit notation and predefined
semantics. If a language does not provide any mechanisms with the
required compositional behavior, programmers need to write workarounds
in the application program, which typically have a negative impact on
the quality of the software. Alternatively, they may introduce the new
composition mechanisms through macros, libraries, frameworks or
language extensions, which also negatively affects the application if
it is not well-integrated with the application program.

This workshop intends to stimulate research in program-ming languages
and software development by exploring the notion that languages should
not offer a limited set of fixed composition mechanisms, but allow for
flexibility, a wide variety of compositions, domain-specific and
tailored compositions, or programmable compositions of various program
artifacts.

Submissions deadline: August 17, 2012

URL: http://trese.ewi.utwente.nl/workshops/FREECO/FREECO-SPLASH2012/

**************************************************************

Neo4j: A Programmatic Introduction to Neo4j
organized by James Webber (Sunday, October 21st)

This is a Wavefront workshop on using Neo4j, a popular graph
database. Graph databases like Neo4j are an esoteric but powerful
member of the NOSQL family. For highly connected data, graph databases
can be thousands of times faster than relational databases, making
them popular for managing complex data across many commercial and
research domains from finance to biology, and network management to
geospatial.

Using graphs, researchers benefit from the expressive model and
centuries of discrete mathematics underlying graph databases and so
they can be a powerful ally for scientific problem solving. To that
end, this Wavefront workshop will introduce Neo4j, a popular
transactional graph database that is widely in use in research and
commerce. The workshop's aims are twofold: to remind attendees of the
beneficial affordances provided by thinking and graphs, and to get
attendees familiar enough with Neo4j such that they can use it to
solve problems in their everyday research efforts. There will
therefore be a mixture of theory and accompanying practical sessions
to demonstrate the capabilities of graph data and the Neo4j
database. Specifically attendees will learn about:

- NoSQL and Graph Database overview to set the scene for contemporary
  data models and to place graphs in context.
- Neo4j Fundamentals and Architecture to show how the notion of
  mechanical sympathy enables extremely fast queries that can be
  several orders of magnitude greater than some relational systems.
- The Neo4j Core API and Indexing to build graphs and name interesting
  starting point for graph queries.
- Neo4j Traverser APIs to traverse graphs to discover interesting
  information goals.
- Declarative querying with Cypher to show how allow non-programming
  specialists can still harness Neo4j for productive use with a humane
  and expressive query language.

Each session is a mixture of a small amount of theory combined with a
set of practical exercises. The practical parts of the workshop
consist of Koan-style lessons where a specific aspect of the Neo4j
stack is presented as a set of failing unit tests which participants
will work to fix, gradually becoming more challenging until the
attendees are capable of implementing sophisticated graph operations
against Neo4j. Attendees won't need any previous experience with Neo4j
or NOSQL databases, but will require some fluency in Java, a little
familiarity with a modern IDE, and a basic understanding of JUnit to
help complete the lab tasks.

URL: http://jimwebber.org/

**************************************************************

PLATEAU - Workshop on Evaluation and Usability of Programming
Languages and Tools
organized by Shane Markstrum, Emerson Murphy-Hill, and Caitlin
Sadowski (Sunday, October 21st)

Programming languages exist to enable programmers to develop software
effectively. But how efficiently programmers can write software
depends on the usability of the languages and tools that they develop
with. The aim of this workshop is to discuss methods, metrics and
techniques for evaluating the usability of languages and language
tools. The supposed benefits of such languages and tools cover a large
space, including making programs easier to read, write, and maintain;
allowing programmers to write more flexible and powerful programs; and
restricting programs to make them more safe and secure.

PLATEAU gathers the intersection of researchers in the programming
language, programming tool, and human-computer interaction communities
to share their research and discuss the future of evaluation and
usability of programming languages and tools. We are also interested
in the input of other members of the programming research community
working on related areas, such as aspects, refactoring, design
patterns, program analysis, program comprehension, software
visualization, end-user programming, and other programming language
paradigms. Some particular areas of interest are:

- empirical studies of programming languages
- methodologies and philosophies behind language and tool evaluation
- software design metrics and their relations to the underlying
  language
- user studies of language features and software engineering tools
- visual techniques for understanding programming languages
- critical comparisons of programming paradigms
- tools to support evaluating programming languages
- psychology of programming

Submissions deadline: August 10, 2012

URL: https://sites.google.com/site/workshopplateau/

**************************************************************

RACES - SPLASH 2012 Workshop on Relaxing Synchronization for Multicore
and Manycore Scalability
organized by Andrew P. Black, Theo D'Hondt, Doug Kimelman, Martin
Rinard and David Ungar (Sunday, 21st October)

Massively-parallel systems are coming: core counts keep rising --
whether conventional cores as in multicore and manycore systems, or
specialized cores as in GPUs. Conventional wisdom has been to utilize
this parallelism by reducing synchronization to the minimum required
to preserve determinism -- in particular, by eliminating data
races. However, Amdahl's law implies that on highly-parallel systems
even a small amount of synchronization introduces serialization that
limits scaling. Thus, the conventional wisdom is doomed to fail as it
hits "the CAS ceiling". We are forced to confront the trade-off
between synchronization and the ability of an implementation to scale
performance with the number of processors: synchronization inherently
limits parallelism.

A new school of thought is arising: one that accepts and even embraces
nondeterminism (including data races), and is in return able to
dramatically reduce synchronization, or even eliminate it completely.
However, this approach requires that we leave the realm of the certain
and enter the realm of the merely probable. How can we cast aside the
certainty of truth, the security of correctness, the logic of a proof,
and adopt a new way of thinking, where answers are good enough but not
certain, and where many processors work together in parallel without
quite knowing the states that the others are in? We may need some
amount of synchronization, but how much? Or better yet, how little?
What mental tools and linguistic devices can we give programmers to
help them adapt to this challenge? This workshop focuses on these
questions and related ones--harnessing parallelism by limiting
synchronization, even to the point where programs will compute
inconsistent or approximate rather than exact answers.

This workshop aims to bring together researchers who, in the quest for
scalability, have been exploring the limits of how much
synchronization can be avoided. We will consider the workshop
successful if the attendees come away with new insights into
fundamental principles, and new ideas for algorithms, data structures,
programming languages, and mental models. The goal of this workshop is
both to influence current programming practice and to initiate the
coalescence of a new research community giving rise to a new subfield
within the general area of concurrent and parallel
programming. Results generated by the workshop will be made persistent
via a workshop website and possibly via the ACM Digital Library.

Submission date: Monday, August 6, 2012

URL: http://soft.vub.ac.be/races/

**************************************************************

VMIL'12 - 6th Workshop on Virtual Machines and Intermediate Languages
organized by Hridesh Rajan, Christoph Bockisch, Michael Haupt, and
Steve Blackburn (Sunday, 21st October)

The VMIL workshop is a forum for research in virtual machines and
intermediate languages. It is dedicated to identifying programming
mechanisms and constructs that are currently realized as code
transformations or implemented in libraries but should rather be
supported at the VM level. Candidates for such mechanisms and
constructs include modularity mechanisms (aspects, context-dependent
layers), concurrency (threads and locking, actors, software
transactional memory), transactions, etc. Topics of interest include
the investigation of which such mechanisms are worthwhile candidates
for integration with the run-time environment, how said mechanisms can
be elegantly (and reusably) expressed at the intermediate language
level (e.g., in bytecode), how their implementations can be optimized,
and how virtual machine architectures might be shaped to facilitate
such implementation efforts.

Submissions deadline: August 17, 2012

URL: http://design.cs.iastate.edu/vmil/

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xDD - What Drives Design?

organized by Dennis Mancl, Steven D. Fraser, Gail E. Harris, and Bill
Opdyke (Sunday, 21st October)

Designers are busy people, and they are getting busier. In today's
world designers must deal with three competing pressures: rapid
changes in end-user technologies and applications domains, marketplace
demands for innovation in products and services, and a steady stream
of improvements in implementation technologies.

There have been a number of attempts to drive design from
responsibilities, features, tests, models, behavior, domains, and
contracts.  If we follow one or more of design approaches, will we
make things better?  Do any of these approaches (RDD, FDD, TDD, and so
on) offer any help to the busy designer?

This workshop is a forum to discuss the design principles that are
most effective.  The workshop will help methodologists and academics
to get some feedback on how their new design ideas are received by
everyday practitioners, and it will be a place for industry
practitioners to share experiences about what design practices work.

Submissions deadline: August 27, 2012

URL: http://mysite.verizon.net/dennis.mancl/splash12

**************************************************************

--
Ulrik Pagh Schultz, associate professor, University of Southern Denmark
ups@mmmi.sdu.dk, http://www.mmmi.sdu.dk/~ups, +4565503570

Call for Workshops -
ACM Conference on Systems, Programming, Languages, and Applications: Software for Humanity (SPLASH'2012)


Date: Wed, 14 Mar 2012 11:10:33 +0000
From: "Ademar Aguiar [FEUP]" <ademar.aguiar@fe.up.pt>
To: "SPLASH'12 Call for Workshops" <workshops@splashcon.org>
Subject: [ecoop-info] SPLASH'12: Call for Workshops - due April 13


**************************************************************
Call for Workshops - Due April 13, 2012

SPLASH’12 WORKSHOPS
as part of ACM Conference on Systems, Programming, Languages, and
Applications: Software for Humanity (SPLASH’12)
Tucson, Arizona
October 19-26, 2012
http://www.splashcon.org
http://twitter.com/splashcon
http://www.facebook.com/SPLASHCon
Sponsored by ACM SIGPLAN
**************************************************************

Workshops are all about sharing, exchanging, discussing, and
networking to mature new and exciting ideas, and help you on starting
new collaborations and communities - whether you are seeking research
partners, projects, or practitioners.

SPLASH workshops are a great way to improve your knowledge and expand
your professional network. The high interactivity of SPLASH workshops
provides a creative and collaborative environment to discuss and solve
challenging problems related to emerging technologies and research
areas with attendees from all over the world. SPLASH workshops
complement the OOPSLA, DLS, Onward! and Wavefront tracks of the
conference, and provide an opportunity to lead informal, hands-on, or
more technical sessions that may possibly result in formal
proceedings.

## Submissions summary

*   Due on: April 13, 2012
*   Notifications: May 08, 2012
*   Camera-ready copy due: June 08, 2012
*   Format: ACM Proceedings format
*   Contacts: Ademar Aguiar and Ulrik Pagh Schultz (chairs)
*   Email: workshops@splashcon.org

## Topics

The topics and the format of the workshops is open-ended. For example,
workshops may provide an opportunity for people working in a particular
area to coordinate efforts and to establish a collective
plan of action, to collaborate on a book, to seek research
contributions, to learn cutting-edge software development techniques,
or to discuss and share ideas on a hot new language, environment, or
topic. In the last 25 years of OOPSLA/SPLASH, workshops have played an
important role in addressing seminal topics that led to significant
advances, especially during their formative stages, namely UML, Eclipse,
distributed objects, agile software development, new programming
languages, and patterns, to mention a few.

Today, the software world is moving forward at an accelerating pace
and the changes in the next 5 years are expected to be more dramatic
than in the last 25. Explosive new technologies have created many
challenging problems - technical, cultural and organizational - that
must be solved to support the next generation of software design and
development.

We encourage proposals for innovative, well-focused workshops from a
broad spectrum of topics. If there is a topic relevant to SPLASH that
you feel passionate about - and you want to connect with others who
have similar interests - you should consider submitting a proposal to
organize a workshop!

## SPLASH Workshops

SPLASH is the successor to the OOPSLA conference that has taken
place annually since 1986. The new name is SPLASH, an acronym for
Systems, Programming, Languages, Applications: Software for
Humanity. It has three tracks, called OOPSLA, Wavefront, and
Onward!. There are many co-located conferences, generally including
the Dynamic Languages Symposium, Generative Programming and
Component Engineering, Pattern Languages of Programming, as well as
symposia for doctoral students and educators.

SPLASH 2012 workshops are organized into three different tracks
according to their topic:

*   OOPSLA workshops are at the frontier software construction and
     delivery.  They are open to all factions of programming
     technologies, and is the place where groups work together to
     develop new ideas in programming languages and software
     engineering.

*   Onward! workshops are located a day's ride past the frontier. They
     are where groups can explore uncharted ideas. They are an ideal
     base for intellectual insurrections. Workshops proposals are
     welcome on all topics related to software and programming,
     especially topics unacceptable at mainstream Computer Science,
     Software Engineering, and Programming Languages conferences.

*   Wavefront workshops are about contemporary approaches to
     develop the systems that software developers are creating and
     deploying today. They are active, hands-on events managed by
     experts, designed to help software professionals to rapidly
     come up to speed on a specific technology or methodology.

Workshop organizers may decide their preferred format.

## Submissions

SPLASH workshop proposals should be limited to 5 pages (in the ACM
Proceedings format) and submitted through the SPLASH submission
system.

You may find detailed guidelines on how to prepare a successful SPLASH
workshop proposal at SPLASH'12 web pages.

## Proceedings

Workshops that result in academic papers and that implement an
appropriate selection process may be archived as formal proceedings in
the ACM Digital Library.

## Workshops Committee

*   Bill Opdyke, JPMorgan Chase, USA
*   Dave Thomas, Bedarra Research Labs, USA
*   Eric Van Wyk, University of Minnesota, USA
*   Erik Ernst, Aarhus University, Denmark
*   Jamie Douglass, Boeing, USA
*   Jeff Gray, University of Alabama, USA
*   Jonathan Sprinkle, University of Arizona, USA
*   Pascal Costanza, Intel, Belgium
*   Paulo Borba, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil
*   Robert Hirschfeld, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, Germany
*   Ademar Aguiar, Universidade do Porto, Portugal (chair)
*   Ulrik Pagh Schultz, Univ. Southern Denmark, Denmark (chair)

## For more Information

For additional information, clarification, or answers to questions
please contact the Workshops Chairs, Ademar Aguiar and Ulrik Pagh
Schultz, at workshops@splashcon.org, or the web site at
http://splashcon.org/2012/cfp/due-april-13-2012/389-workshops

Call for Papers -
ACM Conference on Systems, Programming, Languages, and Applications: Software for Humanity (SPLASH'2012)


From: Matthew Dwyer <dwyer@cse.unl.edu>
Subject: [SEWORLD] SPLASH 2012 Call for Contributions : OOPSLA, Onwards!, Wavefront, and more
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2012 16:09:01 -0600
cc: dwyer@cse.unl.edu, leavens@eecs.ucf.edu
To: seworld@sigsoft.org


CALL FOR PAPERS AND OTHER CONTRIBUTIONS: SPLASH 2012

The Systems, Programming, Languages, Applications: Software for
Humanity (SPLASH) conference is a key venue at the intersection of
programming, programming languages, and software engineering. SPLASH
(and its predecessor OOPSLA) have a long history of fostering
innovation in areas such as programming methods, design and analysis,
testing, concurrency, program analysis, empirical studies, and new
programming languages. SPLASH embraces all aspects of software
construction and delivery, and joins all factions of programming
technologies. Since 2010 SPLASH has been the umbrella for OOPSLA,
Onward!, and the Dynamic Languages Symposium. This year it also
continues a fourth technical track, Wavefront, designed to publish
innovative work closely related to advanced development and production
software.

See http://splashcon.org for details regarding all of the following
calls.

DUE APRIL 13, 2012 ...

OOPSLA Research Papers:

OOPSLA includes all aspects of programming languages and software
engineering, broadly construed. Papers may address any aspect of
software development, including requirements, modeling, prototyping,
design, implementation, generation, analysis, verification, testing,
evaluation, maintenance, reuse, replacement, and retirement of
software systems. Papers on tools (such as new languages, program
analyses, or run-time systems) or on techniques (such as new
methodologies, design processes, code organization approaches, and
management techniques) designed to reduce the time, effort, and/or
cost of creating software systems or improving their performance,
quality and/or usability are of particular interest.

Onward! Papers:

Do you have an idea that could change the world of software
development? Onward! is the place to present it and get constructive
criticism from other researchers and practitioners. We are looking for
grand visions and new paradigms that could make a big difference in
how we build software in 5 or 10 years. We also encourage practicing
programmers to share their hard-won wisdom about how to reform
software development.

Onward! Essays:

The Onward! Essay track is your chance to explore a line of argument,
reflection, or reasoning in writing, and to share that thought process
and its conclusions with your peers.

Wavefront:

Wavefront papers describe original and innovative architecture,
design, and/or implementation techniques used in leading-edge software
systems. Papers from practicing software developers are strongly
encouraged. Research or advanced development papers must address a
problem of immediate concern for such systems and present immediately
applicable results.

Wavefront Experience:

Wavefront Experience Reports are about how we create practical
software systems that solve real-world problems. Wavefront experience
reports are meant to be strongly aligned with the focus of the
Wavefront program, but in the experience papers, we are looking for
discussions about the use of those technologies as opposed to their
creation. How have they made you more (or less) successful? What do
you do differently now? This is your chance to convince your peers
that you have found a better way (or a way to avoid).

Workshops:

Workshops are all about networking, sharing, exchanging, discussing,
and maturing new exciting ideas, to enable you to start new
collaborations and incubate new communities - whether you are seeking
research partners, projects, potential funders, or practitioners to
new and emergent ideas! SPLASH workshops are a great way to grow your
knowledge and expand your professional network. As highly interactive
events, SPLASH workshops provide a creative and collaborative
environment where attendees coming from various organizations around
the world meet to discuss and solve challenging problems related to
emerging technologies and research areas.

Panels:

Panel sessions can be presented within OOPSLA, Wavefront, or Onward!
Many topics are possible, including aspects of software development,
language design issues, language implementation issues, and tools.


DUE JULY 9, 2012 ...

Posters

Posters provide an excellent forum for authors to present their work
in an informal and interactive setting. Posters are ideal to showcase
speculative, late-breaking results or to introduce interesting,
innovative work. Posters sessions are highly interactive. They allow
authors and interested participants to connect to each other and to
engage in discussions about the presented work.

ACM Student Research Competition:

This competition, sponsored by Microsoft Research, is an
internationally recognized venue that enables undergraduate and
graduate students to experience the research world, share their
research results with others, and compete for prizes. The ACM SIGPLAN
Student Research Competition shares the Poster session's goal to
facilitate students' interaction with researchers and industry
practitioners; providing both sides with the opportunity to learn of
ongoing, current research. Additionally, the Student Research
Competition affords students with experience with both formal
presentations and evaluations.

Doctoral Symposium:

The Doctoral Symposium provides students with useful guidance for
completing their dissertation research and beginning their research
careers.

DUE JULY 11, 2012 ...


Dynamic Languages Symposium:

The Dynamic Languages Symposium is a forum for discussion of dynamic
languages, their implementation, and their application. We invite
high-quality papers reporting original research, innovative
contributions or experience related to dynamic language.

DUE JULY 15, 2012 ...

Demonstrations ...

Live demonstrations show the impact of software innovation. The
demonstrations track is an excellent vehicle for sharing your latest
work with an experienced and technically savvy
audience. Demonstrations are not product sales pitches, but rather an
opportunity to highlight, explain, and present interesting technical
aspects of running applications in a dynamic and highly interactive
setting. Presenters are encouraged to actively solicit feedback from
the audience, which should lead to very interesting and entertaining
demonstration sessions.

[Ada-Belgium] To the Ada-Belgium home page.

Last update: 2012/06/30.

Dirk Craeynest